Start a new topic
Implemented

[+15] Allow tasks to have minimum time requirements (as opposed to encouraging speed).

Originally suggested by Kate Attea on April 7, 2015

For example, my 8-year-old hates to read but has to do it for at least 15 minutes/day. Right now it looks like the app would reward her for doing it in less than 15 minutes. I'd rather her accumulate more stars the longer she reads. Same would go for certain chores, other schoolwork, etc.


2 people like this idea

It's been great.  I had about a week that I used the "Easy Evening" exclusively.  The next time that I used the "Average Routine," I had forgotten about the minimum "Wash Dishes" time commitment.  I swiped through early and heard the prompt that minimum time hadn't been reached.  Not only was it effective, but I bust out laughing.  :)  A useful tool, indeed!  


1 person likes this

Thanks for sharing, Caesg! Looking forward to hearing your feedback after you've tried it out.

Hi Pierre,


Thank you Thank you for linking to the blog entry!  I had been watching this question in the support forums for several weeks.  I had the latest version downloaded.  I had noticed that there were two circles, but never played with them.  You've even got the parenthetical "no minimum time set" note on there!  But, for whatever reason, it just never "clicked" for me until you replied with the blog link.  Thanks!   

I have two evening routines set up.  One is the bare minimum, which I assign to a "child" named "Caesg, go easy."  The other is a routine that I am working up to fit the average evening.  The "average evening" routine now has a "Wash Dishes" task that requires my working for at least 10 minutes and no more than 20 minutes.   I'm excited to see how this plays out!

Best,

Caesg

Hi Debbie,


If you're running the latest version of Brili on all your devices, it should work as you describe, providing individual control for parents at the task level. Please see our announcement blog post:

http://www.brili.co/blog/2016/7/14/ensuring-kids-spend-enough-time-brushing-teeth


Hope this is what you were looking for! If not, let us know how you'd like to see it improved!


Thanks,

Pierre



Ugh, I only meant for specic parts of the routine of our choosing. Speed is actually GOOD. For us, makes him focus even MORE and then he REALLY doesn't get distracted when he is behind with Brili is pushing him to go faster than originally programmed. I really hope the whole system was not changed to "lock in" all individual tasks of a given routine, with exception of "play time". 


INSTEAD, let us chose which items need to be "locked" for a specific time, but please DO keep the other individual tasks / parts of the routines variable in time that adjust to hit a LEAVE TIME. Getting out the door with everything done is always our biggest challenge. We loved the adjustable task times - but SOME tasks can't obviously be rushed through, like if they were required for HW to "read 15 minutes". But something like eating has a very high rate of variability for us - both my son and I are VERY slow eaters naturally, and we are the types that can NOT eat and talk at the same time. But IF we are rushed; due to LATE wake up, un predictable and sometime lengthy bathroom issues lol, the "eat breakfast" task can be cut down by 20 minutes and "swiped" through if we decided to eat it later in the car instead, or if we want to chow quickly with no talking and let our inner "soldiers" come out of us, we might be able to slam in all down in a record 5 minutes vs the usual 25 minutes planned. Hope this makes since. The car ride to school was also part of my routine before, because I want them to QUICKLY get in and seat belts on, with no distractions or slow moving which DOES happen. But, the way Brili works, I could not "lock" the commute time, while letting the other tasks estimate and adjust to hit the end goal of "arrive at school", on time. The one task I wanted Brili to focus on removing, was the "play time" which comes BEFORE, 1) put on coat, 2) Grab lunch, and backpack and walk out the door, 3) Get on shoes, 4) Leave for school and get in  "Mommy bus". 5) Drive time to school (needs to be locked). As you can see, #4 is an item that would help them get a "move on" so to speak. To my son, it feels like a game and if he can hit the marks and get the points, it is more fun. Again, he does well when he has to rush because he gets SO focused on "hitting the mark" of the task, so he can hit his "end goal" of get to school on time (which of course, young ADHDers aren't thinking about "in the moment" in most cases - instead, that bug on the ground is more interesting that they wish to check out before getting in the car! ;)

Yes! I really need this as well!!! I hope they hurry


Login or Signup to post a comment